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Exploring the science and magic of Identity and Access Management

Vision without execution is hallucination. — Thomas Edison

Tuesday, December 23, 2014

Earl Perkins: The Identity of Things for the Internet of Things

Identity, Information Security, Internet of Things
Author: Mark Dixon
Wednesday, December 3, 2014
11:20 am

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Earl Perkings, Gartner

Yesterday, at the Gartner Identity and Access Management SummitEarl Perkins, Gartner’s Research Vice President in Systems, Security and Risk, gave a thought-provoking talk, proposing that Identity and Access Management as it is today is not going to cut it for the Internet of Things. Some the highlights include (filtered through the lens of my interpretation):

  • IoT can be described as as set of devices that can sense and interact with the world around it. Such devices can sense, analyze, act and communicate.
  • Devices, services and applications are creators or consumers of information, and must join humans in having identities.
  • Architectural concepts of IAM may still hold, but the scale will be vastly larger and must accommodate more than human identities.
  • Perhaps the word “thing” should be replaced by the term “entity”
  • Every entity has an identity
  • We need a model of entities and relationships between these entities.
  • We must address layered hierarchies of identities.
  • We should not separate device management and identity management systems.
  • Identity Management and Asset Management systems will likely converge.
  • Identity and Access Management may become:
    • Entity Relationship Management
    • Entity Access Management
  • We may think of architectures in four levels: things, gateways/controllers, connectivity, applications and analytics.
  • Two major camps of consumption: Enterprise (where more money is currently being spent) and Consumer (which is hot and sexy, but not currently making much money).
  • Strong year-over-year IoT growth is happening in four industry sectors:
    • Automotive – 67% CAGR
    • Consumer – 32% CAGR
    • Vertical specific – 24% CAGR
    • Generic business – 44% CAGR
  • Companies are “throwing jello against the wall” to see what sticks.

I really like Earl’s ideas about convergence of “entities” and “relationships” between entities.  Please note my blog post Identity Relationship Diagrams  posted in March 2013.

I also favor his view that identity management should not be separate from device management.

It will be interesting to see how architectures are transformed and what “jello sticks to the wall” in the coming years.

 

McAfee Labs Threats Report – Fourth Quarter 2013

Information Security
Author: Mark Dixon
Friday, March 21, 2014
8:05 am

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This morning, I read the recently-released McAfee Labs Threats Report – Fourth Quarter 2013   The lead story was entitled “The cybercrime industry and its role in POS attacks.”  To introduce a timeline chart that includes successful attacks on well known retailers, the report states:

In December, we began to hear of a series of point-of-sale (POS) attacks on multiple retail chains across the United States. The first story to break was specific to Target; this attack has been ranked among the largest data-loss incidents of all time. Soon we learned of more retail chains affected by POS attacks. Neiman Marcus, White Lodging, Harbor Freight Tools, Easton-Bell Sports, Michaels Stores, and ‘wichcraft all suffered similar POS breaches in 2013. Although there has been no public acknowledgment that the attacks are related or carried out by the same actor, many of them leveraged off-the-shelf malware to execute the attacks.

McAfee

Two themes in the article particularly stood out:

  • Many attacks leveraged “off-the-shelf malware”
  • The attacks were executed by a “healthy and growing cybercrime industry”

The article concluded:

We believe these breaches will have long-lasting repercussions. We expect to see changes to security approaches and compliance mandates and, of course, lawsuits. But the big lesson is that we face a healthy and growing cybercrime industry which played a key role in enabling and monetizing the results of these attacks.

Intruders are better prepared, more organized and better equipped than ever.  It’s a crazy world out there.  

 

KuppingerCole: Information Security Predictions and Recommendations 2014

Cloud Computing, Identity, Information Security, Internet of Things
Author: Mark Dixon
Thursday, December 19, 2013
2:53 pm

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Kuppingercole

Kuppinger Cole just released an insightful Advisory Note: “Information Security Predictions and Recommendations 2014.”  The introduction stated:

Information Security is in constant flux. With the changing threat landscape, as well as a steary stream of new innovations, demand for Information Security solutions is both growing and re-focusing.

I like both the predictions and recommendations in this report.  Here are a few excerpts from my favorite recommendations:

Cloud IAM (Identity and Access Management)

Define an IAM strategy for dealing with all types of users, devices, and deployment models that integrates new Cloud IAM solutions and existing on-premise IAM seamlessly.

API Economy

Before entering this brave, new world of the API “Economy”, define your security concept first and invest in API Security solutions. Security can’t be an afterthought in this critical area.

IoEE (Internet of Everything and Everyone)

Before starting with IoEE, start with IoEE security. IoEE requires new security concepts, beyond traditional and limited approaches.

Ubiquitous Encryption

Encryption only helps when it is done consistently, without leaving severe gaps.

The whole paper is well worth reading.  Hopefully, this post whetted your appetite a little bit.

 

$1,000 per Record?

Information Security, Privacy
Author: Mark Dixon
Tuesday, November 19, 2013
5:49 pm

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One Thousand Dollars

Today, I read of at three separate instances where class-action lawsuits have been filed on behalf of people whose personal information had been breached at a healthcare company.  The largest lawsuit, filed against TRICARE, represents 4.9 million affected individuals and is seeking damages of $1,000 per record – a total of $4.9 BILLION. Wow!

This action or other similar lawsuits have yet to be reach court or settlement. Depending on the outcomes, potential costs of litigation and resulting awards to victims may emerge as the single most powerful financial driver to implement good information security in the healthcare industry. 

 

Video: Ann Cavoukian – Privacy and Security by Design: An Enterprise Architecture Approach

Information Security, Privacy
Author: Mark Dixon
Wednesday, November 6, 2013
4:17 pm

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The following video features Ann Cavoukian, Ph.D., Information and Privacy Commissioner, Ontario, Canada, discussing the paper I co-authored with her, “Privacy and Security by Design: An Enterprise Architecture Approach.”

 

Privacy and Security by Design: Foundational Principles

Information Security, Privacy
Author: Mark Dixon
Thursday, September 26, 2013
1:08 pm

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To prepare for my first meeting with Ann Cavoukian earlier this year, I drafted a brief table which proposed a set of principles for Security by Design that aligned with the well-know foundational principles for Privacy by Design. It seemed to me that this would provide a starting point for exploring how security both supported and benefited from Privacy by Design principles.  I published that draft table on my blog back in March of this year.

After reviewing the draft table, Ann asked me to work with her on a paper to amplify this alignment concept.  The result was the paper, “Privacy and Security by Design: An Enterprise Architecture Approach” which was published earlier this week.

The table I originally drafted became the following table published in the final paper:

Privacysecuritytable

 

Video: Privacy and Security by Design: An Enterprise Architecture Approach

Information Security, Privacy
Author: Mark Dixon
Tuesday, September 24, 2013
3:45 am

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In the following video, Dr. Ann Cavoukian describes the paper I was privileged to co-author with her.

More information and a download link is available here.

 

Privacy and Security by Design: An Enterprise Architecture Approach

Information Security, Privacy
Author: Mark Dixon
Monday, September 23, 2013
6:28 am

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PDBToday, we are pleased to announce publication of a paper entitled “Privacy and Security by Design: An Enterprise Architecture Approach,” which I co-authored with Ann Cavoukian, Ph.D., Information & Privacy Commissioner, Ontario, Canada.

In the foreword to the paper, Dr. Cavoukian wrote:

In an earlier paper with Oracle, we discussed the convergence of paradigms between the approach to privacy I have long championed called Privacy by Design, and a similar approach to security called ‘Security by Design.’ The current and future challenges to security and privacy oblige us to revisit this convergence and delve deeper. As privacy and security professionals, we must come together and develop a proactive approach to security – one that is indeed “by design.” To this end, I am delighted to be partnering with Mark Dixon, Enterprise Architect, Information Security, at Oracle Corporation, on this joint paper.

This paper has two key objectives:

  • Define a set of foundational “Security by Design” principles that are modelled upon and support the 7 foundational principles of Privacy by Design.
  • Illustrate an enterprise-level process for defining and governing the strategic journey of Security by Design through an enterprise architecture approach.

To achieve these objectives, the paper includes the following major sections:

  • Foundational Principles of Privacy by Design
  • Foundational Principles of Security by Design
  • The Enterprise Security Journey
  • Conclusion

The conclusion states:

“In this paper, we explored the strong synergy that exists between the related disciplines of privacy and security. While on the one hand, strong security is essential to meet the objectives of privacy, on the other hand, well-known privacy principles are valuable in guiding the implementation of security systems. On the basis of this synergy, we defined a set of foundational principles for Security by Design that are modeled upon and support the foundational principles of Privacy by Design. …

“On the basis of this new Security by Design approach, we then developed an enterprise-level process for defining, governing and realizing a ‘by design’ approach to security. In order to become a reality for enterprises, Security by Design requires strong leadership and continuous goal-setting. However, Enterprise Architecture is an ongoing journey, not a single project or disjointed set of loosely related projects. Our discussion found that if an EA framework is followed to define an EA security strategy in harmony with the holistic, interdisciplinary principles of Privacy by Design and Security by Design, and if a formal governance process is implemented to guide and govern the journey, then an enterprise can be proactive, rather than reactive, in addressing any security concerns.

We hope this paper will assist enterprises to deliver stronger security and better privacy, for all of their stakeholders – a win/win proposition.

 

 

 

Privacy by Design Ambassador

Information Security, Privacy
Author: Mark Dixon
Monday, September 9, 2013
9:12 am

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Coe pbd

It was an honor today to be announced as a Privacy by Design Ambassador by the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario, Canada:

Privacy by Design Ambassadors are an exclusive, but growing, group of privacy thought-leaders committed to ensuring the ongoing protection of personal information by following the Principles of PbD.  Ambassadors advance the case for embedding privacy protective measures in technology, processes and physical design. …

The Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario (IPC) is an independent officer of the Legislature whose mandate is to oversee compliance with public sector access and privacy legislation and health sector privacy legislation in the province of Ontario.

The IPC recognizes ambassadors based on their attestations that they apply the principles of Privacy by Design. The IPC does not endorse any company or product of any recognized ambassador.

It was humbling to be listed among others whom I admire and respect for their contributions to the industry we serve.

I have deeply appreciated the opportunity to work closely with Dr. Ann Cavoukian and her staff on a soon to be announced joint paper on principles of privacy and security.  I look forward to announcing and discussing this paper soon.

 

IoT: A Market Landscape

Identity, Information Security, Internet of Things, Privacy
Author: Mark Dixon
Friday, August 9, 2013
12:14 pm

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Gigaom

Today I read an informative paper published by GigaOM Research entitled, “The Internet of Things: A Market Landscape.”  I find The Internet of Things to be the most interesting area of technology and business in my professional world today.  This paper did an excellent job of providing an overview of the IoT landscape and highlighting both opportunities and challenges.

A few things that I found intriguing:

IoT is not just new technology:

The internet of things is not a single technology trend. Rather, it is a way of thinking about how the physical world at large and the objects, devices, and structures within it are becoming increasingly interconnected.

The market is moving rapidly to mind-boggling scale:

  1. Some 31 billion internet-connected devices will exist by 2020, according to Intel.
  2. A family of four will move from having 10 connected devices in 2012 to 25 in 2017 to 50 in 2022.
  3. Mobile subscriptions will exceed the number of people in the world by early 2014.

Identity is first on the list of important characteristics:

For things to be manageable, they need to be identifiable either in terms of type or as a unique entity. … Identification by type or by instance is fundamental to the internet of things.

The power of IoT comes from connectivity, not just individual components:

The internet of things is an ultra-connected environment of capabilities and services, enabling interaction with and among physical objects and their virtual representations, based on supporting technologies such as sensors, controllers, or low-powered wireless as well as services available from the wider internet.

The biggest challenges?  Security, monitoring and surveillance:

Computer security, say the experts, boils down to protecting the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of both data and services. With the internet of things looking set to create all manner of data, from heart rate and baby monitors to building management systems, there is clearly going to be a great deal to protect. …

The internet of things enables the whole world to be monitored. …  the potential for the inappropriate use of such technologies — for example, to spy on partners or offspring — will grow. In the business context as well, the role of the internet of things offers a wealth of opportunity but also of abuse.

The bottom line?  The possibilities are vast, the challenges daunting, but IoT is happening.  It will be great to go along for the ride.

 
 
 
 
 
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