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Google vs. Bing: What do you think?

Identity
Author: Mark Dixon
Wednesday, June 3, 2009
2:35 am

Thanks to Jonathan Gershater for pointing out a site provided by blackdog.ie that allows side-by-side comparison of Google and Bing search engines.

For my first test, I searched the term "Identity Management" on both engines and observed a few interesting things in the top ten results:

  • Wikipedia, that bastion of Internet truth, is the first item in the results list.
  • Oracle Identity Management was second and fifth on Bing, but was aced out by Ash’s Identity Management Rantings on Google.  Congratulations, Ash!
  • Sun Identity Management came in after Oracle on Google (an interesting fact, considering the pending merger), but alas, didn’t show up on the Bing list.
  • Both engines included Novell and Quest, but only Bing showed Microsoft.
  • The "Discovering Identity" blog didn’t make the top ten list on either site. Grrr!

Robin Wauters posted a more in-depth review in Yesterday’s Washington Post.

I suppose these and other inconsistencies will keep Search Engine Optimization experts on their toes as Microsoft tries to mount a serious challenge to Google’s search supremacy.

By the way, with its picturesque mountain landscape, you’ve got to admit that Bing wins the search engine beauty contest.

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13 Responses to “Google vs. Bing: What do you think?”

    I don’t get any blogs on the first page on either Bing or Google when I search for identity management. Wikipedia is 1st, then 2 Oracles, then Sun. Novell and Quest further down the list (still 1st page). Maybe you’re using the Google personalization feature?

    Comment by Jake Kutagiri on June 3, 2009 at 8:58 am

    I tried it again. Google still lists "Ash’s Identity Management Rantings"
    (identityman.blogspot.com) in the number two position. I’m not aware that I have Google personalized in any way. Interesting …

    Comment by Mark Dixon on June 3, 2009 at 11:19 am

    Thanks Mark!
    What’s odd is that I don’t get the same results as you either. I do see that "identity management" yields Quest in spot 2, Oracle in spots 3 and 4. Identropy (http://www.identropy.com) made it in at 7! (woohoo) and my personal blog (identityman.blogspot.com) doesn’t show up in top 10.
    Perhaps its giving different results for different locations? (I’m in NY)

    Comment by Ash on June 3, 2009 at 2:45 pm

    Bing is still young. Ms will now mostly rely on using the 100m monstrous fund to use on marketing instead of trying to beat google "technically".

    bing will remind google of their philosophy. thats a goal and this competition will be a wake up call for google to chase after that dream.

    talk about wave perhaps? ms’s SL2 isnt really impressive. ..

    Regards
    Fobie

    Comment by Fobie on June 9, 2009 at 3:35 am

    Bing’s surging adrenaline will only stop after awhile.

    how many % of the users do you all think belongs to
    a) true fans
    b) curious
    c) 1/2 hearted bored of current’s search engine
    d) comparison sites (blindSearch etc)

    i think…
    20% true fans
    60% curious
    15% 1/2 hearted..
    5% comparison sites

    Regards
    Fobie

    Comment by Fobie on June 9, 2009 at 3:45 am

    The competition between Google and Microsoft can only serve to benefit the average internet user. It will ensure that both companies are always at the top of their game and will force them to be more innovative and to work to attract advertisers. So thank you Microsoft!

    Comment by Lav on June 9, 2009 at 2:02 pm

    I agree. The competition will be positive for consumers.

    Comment by Mark Dixon on June 9, 2009 at 4:43 pm

    Google vs. Bing vs. Yahoo. My Evaluation Report:

    Firstly, Google and Bing results are nearly identical with the exception that MSN/Bing seems to index new content within 48 hours whereby Google takes nearly two weeks. By the time Google indexes two week old content. MSN/Bing already generated even fresher content. Bings motto might be: "Content Served Fresh Daily". Try it yourself. Enter any web address and within 48 hours…Bing has it online.

    It also seems that MSN/Bing also goes a long way by excluding many of the opportunistic ad farming websites that Google embraces under their so-called "Google monetization policy". Google seems to look the other way when it comes to sites that just generate ad clicks. When ad farm sites and third-party directories are reported to Google as fraud and wasted bandwidth – nothing happens. Possibly because Google is sharing the revenue. Rip-off of advertising dollars. Some advertisers may eventually have a day in court about those seedy practices.

    Lastly, we come to Yahoo. Yahoo has old and stale content. Their business model attempts to charge $299 per year just to index your web site content. Check it out; Yahoo content will differ greatly from Google and MSN/Bing and upon further evaluation…it will be old content and obscure content beause Google and MSN/Bing have the first 5 pages crowded with relevent content. I am glad that Yahoo turned down the billions from Microsoft. For billions….Microsoft can bury Yahoo and hopefully shape up the business ethics at Google for the better!

    That’s my opinion. Check it out for yourself. If Bing can add some apps, include some Twitter like features – it will surpass Google within 24 months.

    Comment by Jake Gordon on June 9, 2009 at 7:06 pm

    Google vs. Bing vs. Yahoo. My Evaluation Report:

    Firstly, Google and Bing results are nearly identical with the exception that MSNBing seems to index new content within 48 hours whereby Google takes nearly two weeks. By the time Google indexes two week old content. MSNBing already generated even fresher content. Bings motto might be: Content Served Fresh Daily. Try it yourself. Enter any web address and within 48 hours…Bing has it online.

    It also seems that MSNBing also goes a long way by excluding many of the opportunistic ad farming websites that Google embraces under their so-called Google monetization policy. Google seems to look the other way when it comes to sites that just generate ad clicks. When ad farm sites and third-party directories are reported to Google as fraud and wasted bandwidth – nothing happens. Possibly because Google is sharing the revenue. Rip-off of advertising dollars. Some advertisers may eventually have a day in court about those seedy practices.

    Lastly, we come to Yahoo. Yahoo has old, tired and stale content. Their business model attempts to charge $299 per year just to index your web site content. Check it out; Yahoo content will differ greatly from Google and MSNBing and upon further evaluation…it will be old content and obscure content beause Google and MSNBing have the first 5 pages crowded with relevent content. I am glad that Yahoo turned down the billions from Microsoft. For billions….Microsoft can bury Yahoo and hopefully shape up the business ethics at Google for the better!

    That’s my opinion. Check it out for yourself. If Bing can add some apps, include some Twitter like features – it will surpass Google within 24 months.

    Comment by Jake Gordon on June 9, 2009 at 7:08 pm

    Thanks, Jake, for your comments. It sounds like the immediacy of Bing indexing and fresh, reliable content are strong advantages for Bing over Google and Yahoo.

    Comment by Mark Dixon on June 9, 2009 at 9:40 pm

    so bias Jake Gordon,
    but i like it. microsoft is our muscle man 🙂

    Comment by Fobie on June 9, 2009 at 10:30 pm

    Bing is a neat, but it will is unlikely unseat Google as the dominant search engine. It’s like Google trying to enter the operating system market. They would have a long way to go before people trust the brand to run their computers. Same goes for Bing. It makes no difference to people whether the search results are more relevant or not, they trust the Google brand more. And this is where Microsoft needs to make a dent in the coming years.

    Comment by Mark on September 30, 2009 at 6:40 am

    It will be interesting to see how things transpire on the OS and search engine front over the next five years.

    Comment by Mark Dixon on September 30, 2009 at 11:38 am

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