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Exploring the science and magic of Identity and Access Management
Thursday, October 29, 2020
 

Identity Map – Knowledge

Identity
Author: Mark Dixon
Friday, December 23, 2005
4:39 am

Knowledge:
"the fact or condition of having information"

Accumulated information or knowledge is a key differentiator between individuals.

Knowledge acquistion arises out of experience – thoughts and actions may lead to knowledge. Knowledge implies retention of information, not just exposure to it. For example, two students may read the same text and retain significantly different amounts of knowledge.

We in the information industry speak much of knowledge workers or knowledge management, implying that accumulated or applied knowlege has significant worth.

An interesting tenet of the religion I espouse states that “Whatever principle of intelligence we attain unto in this life, it will rise with us in the resurrection. And if a person gains more knowledge and intelligence in this life through his diligence and obedience than another, he will have so much the advantage in the world to come.” (Doctrine & Covenants 130:18-19)

Some knowledge is widely shared. For example, knowledge of the English language is shared by millions of people.

Other knowledge is public, but not well known. For example, you probably don’t know the names of my children, although that information is publicly available.

Some knowledge is private. For example, I share my Social Security Number only with trusted parties.

The more private the knowledge, the less likely it can be used by an identity thief to impersonate another person.

Someday I’ll write a blog about Knowledge and Truth. But today I’ll close with another theological statement about the relationship between knowledge and truth: “And truth is knowledge of things as they are, and as they were, and as they are to come.” (Doctrine & Covenants 93:24)

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